Classic Book Challenge

This week was finals week and I got to go back to my hometown yesterday. Today starts the beginning of summer break. Every summer break, I enjoyed spending time with my family.

I like to read as well. In between semesters, I always do a challenge with books that are classic. I attempt to start and finish them by the end of the semester. This summer break’s book is Oliver Twist. Some of the classic books I read were books that were recommended by others and some were not.

The ones that were never recommended were Les Misérables and Oliver Twist. I actually read the entire Les Misérables in less than one summer. It was my love for the musical that gave me the courage to read the unabridged book. I honestly have no idea what made me decide to read Oliver Twist at some point. I think it might have something to do with Les Misérables because the musical of Oliver inspired the lyricist to make a musical of the book.

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My dad recommend Don Quixote, Tale of Two Cities and Great Expectations. He recommended me to read Tale of Two Cities due to my love for Les Mis because the book takes place during the French Revolution and that event happened before the events in Les Mis took place. He even knew that I should read Great Expectations as well because I love Charles Dickens. My dad told me some about Don Quixote and I think he told me about the nature of him being a knight errant and told me about his squire, Sancho Panza. I eventually did a project in school about Don Quixote and was fascinated in reading the book after discovering that Don quixote is a tragicomic character, a type of character I never discovered before.

So why do I attempt to read the classics in a short period of time? Well during the school year, it is too hard to read a classic due to how challenging they are. So the only time I can actually read them is in between semesters. Also giving me a goal of when to finish them gives the motivation to continue reading. Look at Don Quixote and Les Misérables: they were the longest classics I read and finished them in one summer. There are days while reading these classics that made it much harder to read them.

So this summer’s challenge belongs to Oliver Twist.

a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/final/”>Final

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Author: mphadventuregirl

I am a strong spiritual person who is a big fan of musicals. This blog deals with spirituality and musicals. I am finding that by writing about these, I am realizing I know more about each of them then I think I do. I hope you find my blog inspiring!

14 thoughts on “Classic Book Challenge”

    1. Victor Hugo wrote Les Misérables and Charles Dickens wrote Oliver Twist.

      I would recommend reading the unabridged versions of both. In the case of Les Misérables, which is a brick meaning over 1000 pages, don’t skip over anything including the boring history lessons

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I read both the abridged and unabridged versions of Les Misérables. While reading the abridged, it did not feel like a masterpiece because it felt like something was always missing. But when I read the unabridged, it truly felt like a masterpiece because nothing felt like it was missing.

        As a matter of fact, what helped with reading the unabridged version of Les Misérables was to use my knowledge of the musical to get through it

        Liked by 1 person

      1. Me niether. I did like some of the stories I was stuck with. I did like the Illiad and the Odyssey, Then There Was None, among others. Just most of the ones we were stuck reading were sad stories. Some I knew ahead of time and those were ignored, big mistake. Some I had no clue and still hated them.

        Like

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